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Scheda Riassuntiva
Anno Accademico 2016/2017
Tipo incarico Dottorato
Insegnamento 050691 - INNOVATION ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT
Docente Colombo Massimo Gaetano
Cfu 5.00 Tipo insegnamento Monodisciplinare

Corso di Dottorato Da (compreso) A (escluso) Insegnamento
MI (1386) - INGEGNERIA GESTIONALE / MANAGEMENT ENGINEERINGAZZZZ050691 - INNOVATION ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT

Programma dettagliato e risultati di apprendimento attesi

INTRODUCTION 

 

PART I: Innovation management

The aim of PART I is to provide an overview of the innovation management research field and also an in depth view of three main specific subfields which are and will be of particular interest at the present and in the future. More specifically PART I is organized according the following issues:

1)      Perspective in Innovation;

2)      Design and Innovation;

3)      Innovation in the App Industry;

4)      Open Innovation: Using External Technology to Improve Innovation Performance.

As regards the issue n. 1, the seminar will introduce the research field of Innovation Management. First it will provide an overview of the evolution of the field in the last 40 years. Through this we will identify the main topics, research questions, methodologies and findings. Second we will give a look to future issues: what topics seems to be more interesting and relevant. Given that the field of Innovation Management is inherently multidisciplinary, we will expecially focus on the evolution of Innovation Management in relations to other fields. Finally we will discuss interactions of this field with the specific research topics of the participants and discuss how Innovation Management theories can help addressing your research questions. 

As regards the issue n. 2, the seminar will focus on the Design and Innovation topic. Studies of innovation management have often focused their investigations on two domains: technologies and markets. Technological innovation has been capturing most attention, especially as far as radical technological change is concerned. Design has recently gained much attention among practitioners and scholars as a source of innovation. Still, the role of design in innovation and competition remains a rather young (preparadigmatic) area, with blurred boundaries and often unclear or contrasting perspectives. In this lecture we aim at providing a theoretically solid and empirically grounded view on design from a very specific angle: design as a source of innovation. The lecture first defines what is innovation driven by design and how it stand apart from other approaches of innovation.

As regards the issue nr. 3 an overview of the current status of the research on the App industry and on Big Data will be provided. More precisely innovation cases and examples of emerging strategies and business model will be presented and discussed. The main aim of the lecture is to unveil research opportunities and new trends in the field involving students and leveraging their own experience on widely diffused products as mobile phones Apps.

As regards the issue nr. 4, an overview of current research on open innovation and external technology acquisition will be provided. A particular focus will be given to understanding what factors affect a firm's ability to identify, acquire, integrate and commercialize external technology. A discussion of future promising avenues in open innovation research will be conducted involving the students attending this class.

 

PART II: Innovation Economics

The aim of PART II is to examine core topics of interest to scholars in the economics (and finance) of innovation, relating to:

1)      Open innovation: alliances aimed at the creation and exploitation of new technical knowledge;

2)      The role of universities and public research in local innovation systems;

3)      The role played by financial constraints in hindering firms’ investments in R&D and innovation;

4)      The economic rationale of technology & innovation policies, including the gap between private and social returns to R&D and the presence of imperfections in the capital markets.

These topics also have important managerial and policy implications. Alliances and university-industry collaborations are a key organizational mechanism for innovation. Moreover, the gap in private and public R&D spending and innovative output is reputed by policymakers to be one of the main causes for the slower growth rate that European economies have been experiencing with respect to international competitors.

As regards the issue n. 1, we will consider two hot, interdependent topics in the alliance literature: the choice of the governance of the alliance (equity vs. non equity, selective inclusion of contractual provisions) and the selection of alliance partners. Attention will be given to the predictions of different theoretical lenses (transaction cost economics, competence based theory, property right theory, contract theory).

As regards the issue n. 2, we will examine the role of university in fostering the birth of new innovative firms, their innovation and growth. Particular attention will be devoted to the role of “distance” in moderating the (allegedly positive) effect of universities.

As regards the issue n. 3, we will examine the relation between innovation and financial constraints. Starting with the dispute "Fazzari et al. (1988) vs. Kaplan&Zingales (1997)" we will show the most recent advancements in the definition of internal and external financial constraints, and the necessary data to measure them (survey data vs. accounting data).

As regards the issue n. 4, we will focus on the evaluation of technology/innovation policies, on the different financial instruments to bridge the gap in private and social incentives to pursue R&D investments (special focus will be given to selective vs. automatic subsidies), and on the moderating effects which impact on the effectiveness of such policies (e.g., appropriability concerns).

 

METHOD AND EXPECTATIONS

The course will be organized in 8 modules (see next section for details), each of them delivered in a seminar format. Students are expected to: i) be highly involved in the discussion of the assigned articles, ii) demonstrate critical review skills, and iii) identify the contributions and limitations of the assigned articles. When reading the articles in preparation for class discussion, students should understand the logic behind the theoretical constructs, think about the research design (data, sample, construction of the variables, econometric techniques), and try to interpret the results.

The seminar in module 1 will be first based on instructor presentation and discussion in class. A teamwork session aims at identify connections with the participants' research work.

The seminar in module 2 will be mainly based on case study discussions. The teamwork session aims at increase the participants' perception about the research opportunities provided by Design-Driven Innovation.

Module 3 will be mainly based on case discussion. The instructor will then provide an overview of the current status of research activities in the field.

In module 4, the instructor will provide an overview of current streams of research in open innovation and external technology acquisition. Afterwards, a teamwork on the assigned articles is scheduled. The students are asked to review these papers following criteria provided by the instructor. In the second part of the class, the students will present their review, with a particular focus on identifying and discussing interesting research questions and theoretical perspectives that can be addressed in future research. Finally, the  instructor will moderate a discussion session on the future of open innovation research.

For modules 5 and 7, several main questions will be suggested in preparation for class discussion. It is worth noting that these are only baseline questions, while the class discussion will be more extensive in scope and depth. Students are encouraged to prepare their own questions for class, including clarification questions about issues that were not straightforward in the articles. During the sessions, the instructor will offer some introductory remarks on popular theoretical lenses and crucial research issues. Then around 45 minutes will be devoted to groupwork on the assigned articles. In the second part of the lesson, students assigned as lead discussant of each article will offer a max 10-minute presentation that provides an overview of the article. As lead discussant, students should provide copies of his or her presentation slides to all other participants in the session. The purpose of the presentation is mostly to make sure that everyone is on the same page. The presentation should highlight the motivation, theory, research design, results, and intended contributions of each article, with limited interpretation. We will then thoroughly discuss each article. During the class discussion, students should share thoughts and doubts with the other students and the instructor. At the end of the session, we will offer some concluding remarks that provide an integrative view of the module.

For modules 6 and 8, the instructor will offer some introductory remarks on popular theoretical lenses and crucial research issues. Then around 1 hour will be devoted to groupwork on the assigned articles. The articles are the first submission to a well reputed journal. The students are asked to make a review of these papers, following a predetermined scheme. In the second part of the lesson, the students will present their review, focused notably on methodological aspects. Then, a general discussion about the papers will follow.

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

Module 1 - Mon July 03rd, h09.30-13.00

Topic: Perspectives in innovation

Instructor: Roberto Verganti

Main contents: innovation, innovation management, evolution of the field of innovation management, from the '80s till nowadays. The new challenges of the field. Connection with the students specific  research problem

Reading assignments

Stanley F. Slater, Jakki J. Mohr, and Sanjit Sengupta, “Radical Product Innovation Capability: Literature Review, Synthesis, and Illustrative Research Propositions”, J PROD INNOV MANAG 2014;31(3):552–566.

Mary M. Crossan and Marina Apaydin, “A Multi-Dimensional Framework of Organizational Innovation: A Systematic Review of the Literature”, Journal of Management Studies, Volume 47, Issue 6, pages 1154–1191, September 2010

Scott A. Shane, Karl T. Urich, “Technological Innovation, Product Development, and Entrepreneurship in Management Science”, Management Science, Vol. 50, No. 2, February 2004, pp. 133–144.

Background literature

Montoya-Weiss, Mitzi M. and Calantone, Roger (1994). Determinants of New Product Performance: A Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Product Innovation Management 11(5):397–417. 

Rosanna Garcia, Roger Calantone, “A critical look at technological innovation typology and innovativeness terminology: a literature review”, The Journal of Product Innovation Management 19 (2002) 110—132.

V. Krishnan, Karl T. Ulrich, Product Development Decisions: A Review of the Literature, Management Science, Vol. 47, No. 1, January 2001 pp. 1–21

 

Module 2 - Mon July 03rd, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Design and Innovation

Instructor: Claudio Dell'Era

Main contents: design, user centered innovation, design-driven innovation, creative industries

Reading assignments

Brown T (2008). Design Thinking. Harvard Business Review, 84-92.

Dell’Era C and Verganti R (2010). Collaborative strategies in design-intensive industries: knowledge diversity and innovation. Long Range Planning, Vol. 43, Pp. 123-141.

Ravasi C and Stigliani I (2012). Produt Design: a Review and Research Agenda for Management Studies. International Journal of Management Reviews, 14 (4), 464-488.

Verganti R (2008). Design, Meanings, and Radical Innovation: A Metamodel and a Research Agenda. Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 25, Pp. 436-456.

Background literature

Martin R (2009). The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press.

Norman DA (2004). Emotional Design. Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things, Basic Books.

Verganti R (2006). Innovating through design. Harvard Business Review.

Verganti (2009). Design-Driven Innovation. Changing the Rules of Competition by Radically Innovating What Things Mean. Harvard Business Press, Boston.

 

Module 3 - Mon July 10th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Research in the App Industry

Instructor: Tommaso Buganza

Main contents: Service Design, Complementary assets in the APP industry, Technology Epiphanies, Two-sided Markets, Customization and personalization in service industry, Ecosystems and platforms. New challenges and research opportunities on the field.

Reading assignments

Downes, L., & Nunes, P. F. (2013). Big-bang disruption: A new kind of innovator can wipe out incumbents in a flash. Harvard Business Review, 1-12.

Gawer, A., & Cusumano, M. A. (2014). Industry platforms and ecosystem innovation. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 31(3), 417-433.

Von Ahn, L., Maurer, B., McMillen, C., Abraham, D., & Blum, M. (2008). recaptcha: Human-based character recognition via web security measures.Science, 321(5895), 1465-1468.

Background literature

McAfee, A., Brynjolfsson, E., Davenport, T. H., Patil, D. J., & Barton, D. (2012). Big Data. The management revolution. Harvard Business Review, 90(10), 61-67.

Tushman, M. L., Anderson, P. C., & O’Reilly, C. (1997). Technology cycles, innovation streams, and ambidextrous organizations: organization renewal through innovation streams and strategic change. Managing strategic innovation and change, 3-23.

Parker, G. G., & Van Alstyne, M. W. (2005). Two-sided network effects: A theory of information product design. Management Science, 51(10), 1494-1504.

Verganti, R. (2011). Radical design and technology epiphanies: A new focus for research on design management. Journal of Product Innovation Management,28(3), 384-388.

 

Module 4 - Tue July 11th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Open Innovation

Instructor: Federico Frattini

Main contents: overview of current research on open innovation and external technology acquisition will be provided, factors affecting a firm's ability to identify, acquire, integrate and commercialize external technology. Future promising avenues in open innovation.

Reading assignments

Bianchi, M., Frattini, F., Lejarraga, J. and Di Minin, A. (2014). Technology exploitation paths: combining technological and complementary resources in new product development and licensing, Journal of Product Innovation Management

Lewin, A.Y., Massini, S. and Peeters, C. (2011). Microfoundations of Internal and External Absorptive Capabity Routines, Organisation Science

Kotlar, J., De Massis, A., Frattini, F., Fang, H. and Bianchi, M. (2013). Technology Acquisition in Family and Non-Family Firms: a Longitudinal Analysis of Spanish Manufacturing Firms, Journal of Product Innovation Management.

Background literature

West, J. and Bogers, M. (2014). Leveraging External Sources of Innovation: a Review of Research on Open Innovation, Journal of Product Innovation Management

Cohen, W. and Levinthal, D. (1990). Absorptive Capacity: a New Perspective on Learning and Innovation, Administrative Science Quarterly

Cassiman, B. and Veugelers, R. (2006). In search of Complementarities in Innovation Strategy: Internal R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition, Management Science

Chrisman, J., Chua, J., De Massis, F., Frattini, F. and Wright, M. (2014). The Ability and Willingness Paradox in Family Firm Innovation, Journal of Product Innovation Management

Lane, P., Balaji, K. and Seemantini, P. (2006). The Reification of Absorptive Capacity: a Critical Review and Rejuvenation of the Construct, Academy of Management Review.

 

Module 5 - Thu July 13th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Alliances

Instructor: Massimo G. Colombo

Reading assignments

Colombo, M. G., Shafi, K. 2016. Swimming with sharks in Europe: When are they dangerous and what can new ventures do to defend themselves?. Strategic Management Journal 37, 2307–2322.

Diestre L., Rajagopalan N. 2012. Are all “sharks” dangerous? new biotechnology ventures and partner selection in R&D alliances. Strategic Management Journal 33, 1115–1134.

Dushnitsky, G., Shaver, J. M. 2009. Limitations to interorganizational knowledge acquisition: the paradox of corporate venture capital. Strategic Management Journal 30, 1045-1064.

Background literature

Colombo M.G. 2003. Alliance form: A test of the contractual and competence perspectives. Strategic Management Journal 24, 1209-1229.

Lerner J., Malmendier U. 2010. Contractibility and the design of research agreements. American Economic Review 100(1), 214-246.

Kogut B. 1988. Joint ventures: Theoretical and empirical perspectives. Strategic Management Journal 9, 319-332.

Williamson O.E. 1991. Comparative economic organization. The analysis of discrete structural alternatives. Administrative Science Quarterly 36, 269-296.

Gulati R. 1995. Does familiarity breeds trust? The implications of repeated ties for contractual choice in alliances. Academy of Management Journal 38, 85-112.

Oxley J.E. 1997. Appropriability hazards and governance in strategic alliances: A transaction cost approach. Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization 13, 387-409.

 

Module 6 - Fri July 14th, h10.30-13.30

Topic: Universities and innovation: the role of distance

Instructor: Massimiliano Guerini

Papers for review

Bonaccorsi A., Colombo M.G., Guerini M., Rossi Lamastra C. 2013. University specialization and new firm creation across industries. Small Business Economics 41, 837–863.

Bonaccorsi A., Colombo M.G., Guerini M., Rossi Lamastra C. 2014. The effect of Higher Education Institutions on the creation of new firms: Offering comprehensive evidence on the Italian case. Small Business Economics, forthcoming.

Background literature

Cohen W., Lenvinthal M., Nelson R.R., Walsh J.P. 2002. Links and Impacts: The Influence of Public Research on Industrial R&D. Management Science 48(1), 1-23.

Acs Z., Audretsch D.B., Braunerjhelm P., Carlsson B. 2009. The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics 32(1), 15-30.

Belenzon S., Schankerman A. 2013. Spreading the word: Geography, policy and knowledge spillovers. Review of Economics and Statistics 95(3), 884–890.

Jaffe A.B., Trajtenberg M., Henderson R. 1993. Geographic localization of knowledge spillovers as evidenced by patent citations. Quarterly Journal of Economics 63(3), 577–598.

Boschma R. 2005. Proximity and innovation: A critical assessment. Regional Studies 39(1), 61–74.

 

Module 7 - Mon July 17th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Financial constraints

Instructor: Massimiliano Guerini

Reading assignments

Guariglia A. 2008. Internal financial constraints, external financial constraints, and investment choice: Evidence from a panel of UK firms. Journal of Banking & Finance 32(9), 1795–1809.

Colombo M.G., Croce A., Guerini M. 2013. The effect of public subsidies on firms’ investment–cash flow sensitivity: Transient or persistent? Research Policy 42, 1605-1623.

Hottenrott H., Peters B. 2012. Innovative Capability and Financing Constraints for Innovation: More Money, More Innovation? The Review of Economics and Statistics 94(4), 1126-1142.

Background literature

Fazzari S.M., Hubbard R.G., Petersen B.C. 1988. Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment. Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 1, 141–206.

Kaplan S.N., Zingales L. 1997. Do Investment-Cash Flow Sensitivities Provide Useful Measures of Financing Constraints? Quarterly Journal of Economics 112(1), 169–215.

Carpenter R.E., Petersen B.C. 2002. Is the Growth of Small Firms Constrained by Internal Finance? The Review of Economics and Statistics 84(2), 298–309.

Hall B.H. 2002. The Financing of Research and Development. Oxford Review of Economic Policy 18(1), 35–51.

 

Module 8 - Tue July 18th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Innovation policy

Instructor: Massimo G. Colombo

Papers for review

Colombo, M. G., D’Adda, D., Pirelli, L. H. 2016. The participation of new technology-based firms in EU-funded R&D partnerships: The role of venture capital. Research Policy 45(2), 361-375.

Colombo, M. G., Giannangeli, S., Grilli, L. 2013. Public subsidies and the employment growth of high-tech start-ups: assessing the impact of selective and automatic support schemes. Industrial and Corporate Change 22, 1273-1314.

Background literature

David P.A., Hall B.H., Toole A.A. 2000. Is public R&D a complement or substitute for private R&D? A review of the econometric evidence. Research Policy 29, 497-529.

Lerner J., 1999. The Government as Venture Capitalist: The Long-Run Impact of the SBIR Program. Journal of Business 72(3), 285–318.

 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING

60% - Preparation of a review article on one topic related to the ones addressed in the course. Choose the topic that is most relevant to your own research interests. Groupwork is welcome (max 2 students).

40% - Effective presentation of articles and/or active participation in class discussions.


Note Sulla Modalità di valutazione

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING

60% - Preparation of a review article on one topic related to the ones addressed in the course. Choose the topic that is most relevant to your own research interests. Groupwork is welcome (max 2 students).

40% - Effective presentation of articles and/or active participation in class discussions.


Intervallo di svolgimento dell'attività didattica
Data inizio
Data termine

Calendario testuale dell'attività didattica

Module 1 - Mon July 03rd, h09.30-13.00

Topic: Perspectives in innovation

Instructor: Roberto Verganti

 

Module 2 - Mon July 03rd, h14.00-17.30

Topic: Design and Innovation

Instructor: Claudio Dell'Era

 

Module 3 - Mon July 10th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Research in the App Industry

Instructor: Tommaso Buganza

 

Module 4 - Tue July 11th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Open Innovation

Instructor: Federico Frattini

 

Module 5 - Thu July 13th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Alliances

Instructor: Massimo G. Colombo

 

Module 6 - Fri July 14th, h10.30-13.30

Topic: Universities and innovation: the role of distance

Instructor: Massimiliano Guerini

 

Module 7 - Mon July 17th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Financial constraints

Instructor: Massimiliano Guerini

 

Module 8 - Tue July 18th, h14.00-17.00

Topic: Innovation policy

Instructor: Massimo G. Colombo

 


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schedaincarico v. 1.6.9 / 1.6.9
Area Servizi ICT
21/01/2022